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Golden Liquid

Honey

Commercial honey has also had most of the pollen removed. Bee pollen is considered to be one of the most nutritionally-complete foods available due to its high amino acid and antioxidant content.

Although most commercial honey is not beneficial to your health, raw honey has multiple health benefits. Raw honey is unheated, unprocessed and unpasteurized. Therefore, it is able to keep all of its nutrients intact, as they are not destroyed by processing.

Raw honey contains bee pollen, has a high content of antimicrobial agents, and is full of antioxidants. It will generally have a honey comb included in the jar along with the honey.

Where to find local honey: http://www.honey.com/honey-locator/

1.Improve digestion – Use a tablespoon or two to counteract indigestion since it doesn’t ferment in the stomach.
2.Relieve nausea – Mix honey with ginger and lemon juice to help counteract nausea.
3.Acne cure – It can be used as an affordable face cleanser to fight off acne, gentle on sensitive/all skin types. Take half a teaspoon, warm between hands and spread on face gently, leave on for 10 minutes then rinse with warm water and pat dry.
4.Exfoliator – Honey makes a great exfoliator! Use honey on dry winter skin by adding two cups of honey to a bath, soak for 15 minutes, then add one cup of baking soda for the final 15 minutes.
5.Improve diabetes – Consumption of raw honey can reduce risk of developing diabetes and help aid medication used to treat diabetes. Raw honey increases insulin and decreases hyperglycemia. Add a little at a time and see how your blood sugar reacts to it.
6.Lower cholesterol – It can help reduce cholesterol and therefore decrease your risk for coronary artery disease.
7.Improve circulation – Raw honey makes your brain function optimally by strengthening the heart and improving blood circulation.
8.Antioxidant support – Consumption of raw honey increases plaque-fighting antioxidants.
9.Restore Sleep – Raw honey promotes restorative sleep. Add a tablespoon to warm milk to help increase melatonin and help you sleep.
10.Pre-biotic support – Raw honey is full of natural prebiotics which promote the growth of good bacteria in the intestine.
11.Improve allergies – If sourced locally, raw honey can help reduce seasonal allergies.
12.Lose weight – Substituting raw honey for white sugar can help in weight management
13.Moisturize – A spoonful of raw honey mixed with olive oil and a squeeze of lemon can be used as a hydrating lotion.
14.Hair mask – Raw honey hair mask can help boost shine, mix 1 tsp of raw honey with 5 cups of warm water, rinse thoroughly , air dry and style as usual.
15.Eczema relief – Use to treat mild eczema. Use it as a topical mixture of equal parts of honey and cinnamon.
16.Reduce inflammation – Raw honey has anti-inflammatory agents that can treat respiratory conditions such as asthma.
17.Heal wounds – Raw honey used topically can help quicken healing time for mild burns, wounds, rashes, and abrasions.
18.Cure UTI – Honey can help improve urinary tract infections due to its antibacterial properties.
19.Shampoo – Raw honey can cleanse and restore the health of your hair and scalp. Try this homemade shampoo recipe.
20.Relieve sore throat – Honey uses for sore throats is another fantastic remedy. Simply mix it with lemon essential oil and peppermint oil for fast acting benefits.

#honey

Dull, Brittle Nails, Yuck!

Sulfur is crucial in the development of strong nails and a deficiency can be what’s keeping you from that manicure.

Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) is an odorless, tasteless form of sulfur found naturally in many fruits, veggies and meats, is good for your nails. It’s such an important building block of healthy nail tissue that taking 2,000 to 2,500 milligrams daily can help women grow strong, break-resistant nails within two months. MSM is quickly destroyed when food is heated or processed, so pumping up your levels with a supplement is a smart bet if you’re struggling with not-so-sturdy nails right now. Look for MSM in health food stores and nutrition outlets.

Bonus: According to studies at Oregon Health Sciences, MSM is also a powerful anti-inflammatory that can cut joint pain, muscle pain and headache flare-ups by 82 percent in as few as six weeks.

#Nails

Honey-Chili Sauce

This is excellent on chicken or shrimp!

1/4 cup chopped shallots
2/3 cup honey
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
1-1/2 cups of chicken broth, low sodium
salt and paper to taste
1 teaspoon chopped cilantro
3 Tablespoons chopped pecans

Directions:
Lightly coat a sauté pan with cooking spray, than on medium-high heat sauté the chopped shallots until tender. Add the honey and vinegar to the pan. Quickly stir in the chili powder, cumin, and broth. Bring to a boil and reduce by half. Transfer sauce to blender or food processor and blend at high speed until smooth. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stir in cilantro. Garnish dish with toasted pecans.

Serves 16
Calories: 56
Total Fat: 1g
Protein: 1g
Carbohydrate: 13g
Cholesterol: 0mg
Sodium: 48 mg

Relieve Pain

 

With many chronic ailments, massage can relieve the pain and help heal. As with physical problems,emotional problems may also be stimulated into
self-healing with massage. In many cases, this helps eliminate the need to take harmful chemical drugs, which will unnecessarily burden the liver, kidneys, and other vital organs.

Work Station Positions

Good Working Positions

General Neutral

To understand the best way to set up a computer workstation, it is helpful to understand the concept of neutral body positioning. This is a comfortable working posture in which your joints are naturally aligned. Working with the body in a neutral position reduces stress and strain on the muscles, tendons, and skeletal system and reduces your risk of developing a musculoskeletal disorder (MSD). The following are important considerations when attempting to maintain neutral body postures while working at the computer workstation:

  • Hands, wrists, and forearms are straight, in-line and roughly parallel to the floor.
  • Head is level, or bent slightly forward, forward facing, and balanced. Generally it is in-line with the torso.
  • Shoulders are relaxed and upper arms hang normally at the side of the body.
  • Elbows stay in close to the body and are bent between 90 and 120 degrees.
  • Feet are fully supported by the floor or a footrest may be used if the desk height is not adjustable.
  • Back is fully supported with appropriate lumbar support when sitting vertical or leaning back slightly.
  • Thighs and hips are supported by a well-padded seat and generally parallel to the floor.
  • Knees are about the same height as the hips with the feet slightly forward.

Regardless of how good your working posture is, working in the same posture or sitting still for prolonged periods is not healthy. You should change your working position frequently throughout the day in the following ways:

  • Make small adjustments to your chair or backrest.
  • Stretch your fingers, hands, arms, and torso.
  • Stand up and walk around for a few minutes periodically.

These four reference postures are examples of body posture changes that all provide neutral positioning for the body.

Upright Sitting

Upright sitting posture. The user’s torso and neck are approximately vertical and in-line, the thighs are approximately horizontal, and the lower legs are vertical.

Figure 1. Upright sitting posture

Figure 1. Upright sitting posture

Figure 2. The user's torso and neck are approximately vertical and in-line, the thighs are approximately horizontal, and the lower legs are vertical

Figure 2. The user’s torso and neck are approximately vertical and in-line, the thighs are approximately horizontal, and the lower legs are vertical.

Standing

Standing posture. The user’s legs, torso, neck, and head are approximately in-line and vertical. The user may also elevate one foot on a rest while in this posture.

Figure 3. Standing posture

Figure 3. Standing posture

Figure 4. The user's legs, torso, neck, and head are approximately in-line and vertical

Figure 4. The user’s legs, torso, neck, and head are approximately in-line and vertical.

Declined Sitting

Declined sitting posture. The user’s thighs are inclined with the buttocks higher than the knee and the angle between the thighs and the torso is greater than 90 degrees. The torso is vertical or slightly reclined and the legs are vertical.

Figure 5. Declined sitting position

Figure 5. Declined sitting position

Figure 2. The user's torso and neck are approximately vertical and in-line, the thighs are approximately horizontal, and the lower legs are vertical

Figure 6. The user’s thighs are inclined with the buttocks higher than the knee and the angle between the thighs and the torso is greater than 90 degrees. The torso is vertical or slightly reclined and the legs are vertical.

Reclined Sitting

Reclined sitting posture. The user’s torso and neck are straight and recline between 105 and 120 degrees from the thighs.

Figure 7. Reclined sitting posture

Figure 7. Reclined sitting posture

Figure 8.
The user's torso and neck are straight and recline between 105 and 120 degrees from the thighs

Figure 8. The user’s torso and neck are straight and recline between 105 and 120 degrees from the thighs.

Measles (Rubeola)

What is measles?

Measles is a very contagious (easily spread) infection that causes a rash all over your body. It is also called rubeola or red measles.

The measles vaccine protects against the illness. This vaccine is part of the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) and MMRV (measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella [chickenpox]) vaccines. Most children get the vaccine as part of their regular shots. This is why measles is rare in the United States and Canada.

What causes measles?

Measles is caused by a virus. It is spread when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or shares food or drinks. The measles virus can travel through the air. This means that you can get measles if you are near someone who has the virus even if that person doesn’t cough or sneeze directly on you.

You can spread the virus to others from 4 days before the rash starts until 4 days after the rash appeared. The virus is most often spread when people first get sick, before they know they have it.

If you have had measles, you can’t get it again. Most people born before 1957 have had measles.

What are the symptoms?

The first symptoms of measles are like a bad cold-a high fever, a runny nose, sneezing, a sore throat, and a hacking cough. The lymph nodes in your neck may swell. You also may feel very tired and have diarrhea and red, sore eyes. As these symptoms start to go away, you will get red spots inside your mouth, followed by a rash all over your body.

When adults get measles, they usually feel worse than children who get it.

It usually takes about 7 to 18 days to get symptoms after you have been around someone who has measles. This is called the incubation period.

How is measles diagnosed?

If you think you have measles, call ahead and explain your symptoms before you go to a doctor’s office.

After you’ve had an exam, your doctor may order a blood test and/or viral culture if he or she suspects that you have measles.

How is it treated?

Measles usually gets better with home care. You can take medicine to lower your fever, if needed. Read and follow all instructions on the label. Also, get plenty of rest and drink lots of fluids. Stay away from other people as much as you can so that you don’t spread the disease. Anyone who has measles should stay out of school, day care, work, and public places until at least 4 days after the rash first appeared.

Your doctor may suggest vitamin A supplements if your child has measles.

Most people get better within 2 weeks. But measles can sometimes cause dangerous problems, such as lung infection (pneumonia) or brain swelling (encephalitis). In rare cases, it can even cause seizures or meningitis.

If you have been exposed to measles and you have not had the vaccine, you may be able to prevent the infection by getting immunoglobulin (IG) or the measles vaccine as soon as possible. Babies who are younger than 12 months, pregnant women, and people who have impaired immune systems that can’t fight infection may need to get IG if they are exposed to measles.

Why is prevention important?

Getting your child vaccinated is important, because measles can sometimes cause serious problems.

False claims in the news have made some parents concerned about a link between autism and vaccines. But studies have found no link between vaccines and autism.

Measles is one of the most contagious diseases. Outbreaks can easily occur. For instance, a person from another country may have measles and not know it yet. If that person travels outside his or her own country, he or she could spread measles to people who are not immune. Also, if you travel to another country and you are not immune to measles, you may be at risk.

If you don’t know whether you’re immune to measles and you plan to travel, check with your doctor or local health clinic to see whether you should get the vaccine before you travel.

Impacted Ear Wax

 

Earwax is produced by glands in the ear canal. Although scientists are still not completely sure why we have earwax, its purpose is to trap dust and other small particles and prevent them from reaching, and potentially damaging or infecting the eardrum.

Symptoms of an earwax impaction include:
Decreased hearing
Dizziness
Ear pain
Plugged or fullness sensation
Ringing in the ear
Itching or drainage from the ear canal

See your doctor if you think you may have any symptoms of an earwax impaction. Other conditions may cause these symptoms and it is important to be sure earwax is the culprit before trying any home remedies.